Affordable Hearing Aids in Akron Ohio - Hearing Aids for All Budgets
Reading the Signs
If you answer yes to any of the following questions, Call us for an appointment for your free Hearing Evaluation and Consultation.
Signs and symptoms of hearing loss may include:
  • Muffling of speech and other sounds
  • Difficulty understanding words, especially against background noise or in a crowd of people
  • Trouble hearing consonants
  • Frequently asking others to speak more slowly, clearly and loudly
  • Needing to turn up the volume of the television or radio
  • Withdrawal from conversations
  • Avoidance of some social settings
When to see a doctor
If you have a sudden loss of hearing, particularly in one ear, seek immediate medical attention.
Talk to your doctor if difficulty hearing is interfering with your daily life. Your hearing may have deteriorated if:
  • You find that it's harder to understand everything that's said in conversation, especially when there's background noise
  • Sounds seem muffled
  • You find yourself having to turn the volume higher when you listen to music, the radio or television
Risk factors   By Mayo Clinic Staff
Factors that may damage or lead to loss of the hairs and nerve cells in your inner ear include:
  • Aging. Degeneration of delicate inner ear structures occurs over time.
  • Loud noise. Exposure to loud sounds can damage the cells of your inner ear. Damage can occur with long-term exposure to loud noises, or from a short blast of noise, such as from a gunshot.
  • Heredity. Your genetic makeup may make you more susceptible to ear damage from sound or deterioration from aging.
  • Occupational noises. Jobs where loud noise is a regular part of the working environment, such as farming, construction or factory work, can lead to damage inside your ear.
  • Recreational noises. Exposure to explosive noises, such as from firearms and jet engines, can cause immediate, permanent hearing loss. Other recreational activities with dangerously high noise levels include snowmobiling, motorcycling or listening to loud music.
  • Some medications. Drugs, such as the antibiotic gentamicin and certain chemotherapy drugs, can damage the inner ear. Temporary effects on your hearing — ringing in the ear (tinnitus) or hearing loss — can occur if you take very high doses of aspirin, other pain relievers, antimalarial drugs or loop diuretics.
  • Some illnesses. Diseases or illnesses that result in high fever, such as meningitis, may damage the cochlea.
Comparing loudness of common sounds:
What kind of decibel levels are you exposed to during a typical day? To give you an idea, compare noises around you to these specific sounds and their corresponding decibel levels:
Risk factors   By Mayo Clinic Staff
Factors that may damage or lead to loss of the hairs and nerve cells in your inner ear include:
  • Aging. Degeneration of delicate inner ear structures occurs over time.
  • Loud noise. Exposure to loud sounds can damage the cells of your inner ear. Damage can occur with long-term exposure to loud noises, or from a short blast of noise, such as from a gunshot.
  • Heredity. Your genetic makeup may make you more susceptible to ear damage from sound or deterioration from aging.
  • Occupational noises. Jobs where loud noise is a regular part of the working environment, such as farming, construction or factory work, can lead to damage inside your ear.
  • Recreational noises. Exposure to explosive noises, such as from firearms and jet engines, can cause immediate, permanent hearing loss. Other recreational activities with dangerously high noise levels include snowmobiling, motorcycling or listening to loud music.
  • Some medications. Drugs, such as the antibiotic gentamicin and certain chemotherapy drugs, can damage the inner ear. Temporary effects on your hearing — ringing in the ear (tinnitus) or hearing loss — can occur if you take very high doses of aspirin, other pain relievers, antimalarial drugs or loop diuretics.
  • Some illnesses. Diseases or illnesses that result in high fever, such as meningitis, may damage the cochlea.
    
  •  Depression
  • Anxiety
  • An often false sense that others are angry with you
Unfortunately, most people affected by hearing loss live with these difficulties for years before seeking treatment — or never seek treatment at all. This may also cause lasting problems for those who love you, if you try to cope by denying your hearing loss or withdrawing from social interactions.
Appointments & care At Affordable Hearing aids'  
"All-Ears Hearing Center, we take the time to listen, to find answers
and to provide you the best care. Learn more. Request an appointment
Tests to diagnose hearing loss may include:

Physical exam.
  • General screening tests. Your doctor may ask you to cover one ear at a time to see how well you hear words spoken at various volumes and how you respond to other sounds.
  • Tuning fork tests. Tuning forks are two-pronged, metal instruments that produce sounds when struck. Simple tests with tuning forks can help your doctor detect hearing loss. A tuning fork evaluation may also reveal whether hearing loss is caused by damage to the vibrating parts of your middle ear (including your eardrum), damage to sensors or nerves of your inner ear, or damage to both.
  • Audiometer tests. During these more-thorough tests conducted by an audiologist, you wear earphones and hear sounds directed to one ear at a time. The audiologist presents a range of sounds of various tones and asks you to indicate each time you hear the sound.
  • Each tone is repeated at faint levels to find out when you can barely hear. The audiologist will also present various words to determine your hearing ability.


Areas in the Brain where Speech and Hearing Lobes are located
Memory